Resources

Gay & Lesbian Archives of the Pacific Northwest (GLAPN)
http://www.glapn.org/
“Since 1994, we have been working to discover and publicize the history of sexual minorities in the Pacific Northwest. We collect, preserve, document, and share as much as we are able….Our physical collections are part of the library at Oregon Historical Society.”

Oregon Historical Society and the Davies Family Research Library
http://ohs.org/research-and-library/
“We invite you to explore the world’s largest collection of Oregon-related materials, including photographs, manuscripts, books, maps, oral histories, motion pictures, videotapes, newspapers, ephemera, and much more. All our resources are available to everyone.”

Q Center
http://www.pdxqcenter.org
“Mission: The center provides a safe space to support and celebrate LGBTQ diversity, equity, visibility and community building.”

University of Washington, Libraries, Special Collections
http://www.lib.washington.edu
scroll down to Libraries at the UW and click on Special Collections > Pacific Northwest Collections > Research Ideas, Guides & Exhibits,
scroll down to Ethnic, Gender, & Religious Communities and click on GLBTQ: Special Collections & Archival Resources
“This guide highlights archival and printed materials, archived websites, and photographs available in Special Collections that relate to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer community in the Pacific Northwest.”

OutHistory
http://outhistory.org/
“OutHistory.org was founded in October 2008 by Jonathan Ned Katz, author of the groundbreaking Gay American History (1976) and other books on the history of sexuality.”

ONE Archives
http://one.usc.edu/
“ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives at the USC Libraries is the largest repository of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer (LGBTQ) materials in the world.”

It Gets Better
http://www.itgetsbetter.org/
“The It Gets Better Project’s mission is to communicate to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender youth around the world that it gets better, and to create and inspire the changes needed to make it better for them.”

This Way Out
http://thiswayout.org/
This Way Out: The International LGBT Radio Magazine” is going stronger than ever in its 27th year. “This Way Out” is the award-winning internationally distributed weekly LGBT radio program, currently airing on over 200 local community radio stations around the world—and available by podcast.

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Rachel Maddow reports on the political power of the KKK in the 1920s. (19 min. 34 sec.) – “Donald Trump Remarks Aid White Supremacists’ Political Ambitions”

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Rachel Maddow lays out the history of eugenics in the USA dating back to the 1920s. (16 min. 32 sec.) – “US Anti-Immigrant Policy Has Roots In Racist Eugenics”

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The Wolverine Orchestra with Bix Beiderbecke – “Jazz Me Blues” (1924)

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 King Oliver’s Creole Jazz Band – “Dipper Mouth Blues” (1923) featuring a young Louis Armstrong.

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“Livery Stable Blues” recorded by the Original Dixieland Jass Band on February 26, 1917 is widely acknowledged as the first jazz recording commercially released.

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from Wikipedia:
On February 14, 1920, Smith recorded “That Thing Called Love” and “You Can’t Keep a Good Man Down” for Okeh Records, in New York City, after African-American songwriter and bandleader Perry Bradford persuaded Fred Hagar. This was the first recording by a black blues singer; the musicians, however, were all white. Hagar had received threats from Northern and Southern pressure groups saying they would boycott the company if he recorded a black singer. Despite these threats the record was a commercial success and opened the door for more black musicians to record.

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